Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students

Clubs and organizations need to raise money throughout the school year for equipment, educational trips, and uniforms.

Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students

Sign Up For Free Newsletter Kids, Soda, and Obesity At a time when more kids are overweight and obese than ever, why are soft drinks more popular than ever?

By Chris Woolston, M. Every day for years, many kids have lined up at vending machines to buy their ounce bottles of sugar and carbonated water before they go off to study important subjects like history, math, and, yes, nutrition.

Of course, federal guidelines introduced in early propose to phase out the marketing of soda and other sugary drinks and junk food during the academic school day. But this will take time. In the early s, 60 percent of all American middle schools and high schools sold soft drinks in vending machines, according to the Journal of the American Medical Association.

An estimated school districts went so far as to sign exclusive contracts with beverage companies to install vending machines in their schools, and put their corporate logos on scoreboards and book covers.

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In return, the schools got cash -- sometimes hundreds of thousands of dollars a year, or more. At a time when school districts everywhere were strapped for cash, that kind of money was nearly impossible to resist.

It bought band uniforms, football helmets, computers, and new books for the library. The companies, in turn, got a chance to build brand loyalty among young customers. But what were the kids getting? Consider the ingredients in that ounce bottle of cola: Carbonated water, natural and artificial flavors, a little caffeine, and about 17 teaspoons of sugar, which together add up to calories.

Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students

All of those empty calories put schools in a dilemma: Many administrators clearly felt that the benefits of soda contracts outweigh the risks, and in the Alliance for a Healthier Generation spearheaded an agreement with beverage groups to sell only water, juices, and non-diet soda in elementary and middle schools.

At a time when Nobody believes that soft drinks are the only cause of obesity among young people, but sugary drinks can definitely help pile on the pounds, says Melinda Sothern, Ph. Sothern is the co-author of Trim Kids, a weight-loss guide for overweight children and their parents.

Age 9, pounds Sothern has found that many of the severely obese kids who visit her weight-loss clinic "drink their calories. When questioned by the staff, the girl said she drank four or five ounce sodas a day. Of course, few children can stomach ounces of soda each day, and even fewer top pounds.

Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students

But plenty of kids manage to drink plenty of soda. By the latest estimate, two-thirds of all girls and three-fourths of all boys have at least one soft drink each day.

In the not-too-distant past, soda was an occasional treat, something kids had when they went out for pizza with friends, says Margo Wootan, Ph. Somewhere along the line, it became a daily indulgence. In a study that was the first of its kind, Harvard researchers tracked both the weights and the soft drink consumption of grade school children for two years.

As reported in The Lancet, each daily serving of a sugary drink appears to raise the risk of obesity by 60 percent.Yes that would be a great idea to sell candy and sugary because it would be easier and rake less time to raise money 5 points Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students Ask for details ; Follow Report by Do2riTin8ald Yes that would be a great idea to sell candy and sugary because it would be easier.

I strongly believe that school should not sell chips, candies, and sugary drinks. I know that schools are raising money, but why sell junks? Replace chips with baked potatoes, replace candies with dried fruits and cereal bar, replace sugary drinks with fruit cups, . Soft Drink Company Pledges to Sell Only Water, Low-Fat Milk, Non-Sugary Juice in International Primary Schools PepsiCo: No Sugary Drinks in World Schools. Puska said defeating childhood. Kids, Soda, and Obesity As reported in The Lancet, each daily serving of a sugary drink appears to raise the risk of obesity by 60 percent. The growing political movement against soft drinks in schools. Journal of the American Medical Association (17):

Recently, our school held a blood drive with the local blood bank. After interviewing a group of potential student donors, blood bank workers announced school-wide that students must eat before giving blood. A candy bar is not a meal, they said rather forcefully.

Increasingly, students also munch on these school-bought sweets during class. I strongly believe that school should not sell chips, candies, and sugary drinks.

I know that schools are raising money, but why sell junks? Replace chips with baked potatoes, replace candies with dried fruits and cereal bar, replace sugary drinks with fruit cups, .

People invited to a presentation do not need a Prezi Transcript of Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft. Topic 1 Eating during class More/Better textbooks Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft-drinks to students?

cons-eating in class _chocolate melts in the summer-you have to buy the candy. This May 23, article from Metroactive News reports on proposals that tax soft drink sales to raise money for schools, ban soda sales at school, and otherwise target junk food.

The schools should raise money by selling candy and sugary soft drinks to students because school have their have own expenses it is very difficult for school to bear those expenses.

Should schools raise money by selling candy and sugary soft by on Prezi